Cell Phones

E-Waste
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Illegal in Garbage & Drains
Trash Bin

Never Throw in the Trash

Cell phones contain toxic metals that can harm the environment, as well as precious metals, silicone, glass and plastic that can be reused. Phones are a major source of e-waste, so don’t throw them in the trash.

Alternative Ways to Recycle

Best-Buy-logo

Best Buy's Electronics and Appliances Recycling Program

Best Buy will take back cell phones and many other home electronics for free; they also offer a buyback program for more desired electronics. They accept up to three items per day from each household. Find a location here.

Staples

Staples' Take Back Program

Staples offers free, in-store recycling for unwanted electronics, including cell phones, desktop computers, tablets, monitors and other electronics. Locate your nearest Staples.

HP

HP Hardware Recycling

HP accepts computer and electronics hardware from various manufacturers for free mail-in recycling, cash back or trade-ins. Get a quote for your hardware or a mail-in voucher here.

Apple

Apple Store Gift Card

Apple runs a reuse and recycling program for unwanted iPhones, iPads, Mac or PC computers and displays. Depending on the condition of your electronics, Apple can give you credit if they have monetary value. Find out more.

LG logo

LG Recycling Program

Ship your LG phone to be recycled with a free, prepaid shipping label. Find out more.

samsung

Samsung Mobile Take-Back Program

Send any model of Samsung mobile device, along with any accessories, to be recycled at no cost. Simply print out a pre-paid shipping label. Find out more.

microsoft

Microsoft Trade-In and Recycling Program

Visit any Microsoft store location to trade in old devices, game consoles or games for Microsoft store credit. If your items no longer carry substantial value, they will be wiped of data and safely recycled. If you aren’t near a store location, you can request a prepaid postage label to mail in your items.

hope phones

Donate for Global Public Health

Hope Phones takes any phone, working or not, and provides free shipping. The funds they receive from recycling or selling phones go towards purchasing technology for global public health workers with the non-profit Medic Mobile. Find out more.

hopeline

Donate for Domestic Violence Survivors

Ship any working phone or phone accessory free of charge to Verizon’s HopeLine program, which gives them to survivors of domestic violence. Recipients of refurbished phones also get free calls and texting. Find out more.

cell phones for soldiers

Donate to a Soldier

Cell Phones for Soldiers is a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing cost-free communication services to active-duty military members and veterans. They have both donation and buyback programs. Find out more.

electronics-interconnection-logo

InterConnection Charitable Reuse & Recycling

Donate smartphones and laptops less than 7 years old to InterConnection’s Charitable Computer Reuse and Recycling program. Smartphones cannot have a broken screen, and laptops must be able to turn on. Hard drives will be wiped as soon as items are received. Download a free shipping label here.

Ways to Reuse

Repurpose your Smartphone

There are a lot of applications to give your phone a new life. And old smartphone can be used as a flash drive, a mobile mouse/trackpad or a baby monitor. Find lots of other creative uses at infotech101.com or makeuseof.com.

Did You Know?

The Problem of E-Waste

E-waste is a dangerous business in India and China, where e-waste recycling plants release toxic chemicals into the air and cause health problems for recycling workers. To learn more about e-waste, check out The Story of Stuff Project.

Smartphone Metals Irreplaceable

Researchers at Yale University analyzed all 62 metals used in smartphones and other contemporary consumer electronics, expecting to find at least a few that had potential material substitutes. However, none of the metals analyzed have a substitute for all functions, and 12 have no possible replacement at all. Read more at Yale News.